Museum Hack is in Museum magazine!

The March / April issue of Museum, by the American Alliance of Museums, is out — and we’re in it!  We’re thrilled to be featured on the cover and in their feature story about Attracting and Working with Millennials.

Cover of March/April 2016 issue of Museum magazine

This issue explores how museums can engage the next generation of museum lovers and patrons: Millennials.  As Laura L. Lott stated in her letter, millennials, “through their decisions and behaviors, are showing us the path to the future.”  This demographic is the first generation to be truly global — and their influence is focused on social issues.  And museums are poised to become a key player in offering solutions to those issues.  Yet less than one-third — and, for some museums, less than ten percent — of regular museum-goers are Millennials. 

In “The Millennial Museum,” Michael Cannell explored new ways to engage young professionals — and that included us!  Read this excerpt from his article to find out more:

The group met at the designated rendezvous: a pharaoh statue in the grand entry hall of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Nine visitors, ranging from teens to a 55-year-old, signed up for a tour conducted by Museum Hack, a group that leads unauthorized gallery excursions with an emphasis on subversive fun. The guide was Michelle Yee, a 30-year-old art historian.

They joined hands in a huddle, like players before a kickoff.  “On three, give me a MUSEUM!” Yee said.

For the next two hours, she led a brisk “tasting menu” of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhaustive collection in Manhattan.  The group took selfies with homely Colonial American portraits, viewed 4,000-year-old raisins in the Egyptian wing, debated the merits of a taxidermy deer coated in glass bubbles and sat on the floor like kindergartners while Yee told the racy back story behind a Prussian walking stick.

[…]

Is the lightened-up, fun-heavy museum the way to enlist younger visitors?  It works for Museum Hack.  The group offers tours of the Met and the American Museum of Natural History in New York (each $60) and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. ($50).  It has no association with these institutions, but you can bet curators heed its lesson: If you free the gallery tour of pretension, the young and curious will show up.

Read the full article “The Millennial Museum,” in Museum magazine.

Do you want to develop engaging museum programs for millennials?  We can help!  Learn more about our audience development consulting or email us to discuss how we can help your museum engage and retain millennial audiences.

Do you have a blog, and would like to write about Museum Hack? Send us an email at [email protected].

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