Meet Bex: Tour Guide at Museum Hack

Bex gives amazing adventures at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. She is a vibrant museum enthusiast, who uses her passion and quirkiness to get people excited about museums. Read the interview below to find out why she would be reincarnated as a giraffe, and her thorough plan for what she would do if she could spend the night in the museum (it involves a massive game of hide-and-seek and lots of singing.)

1. Which museum do you give tours at?
I give tours at the greatest museum in the world, the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

2. Why did you apply to work with Museum Hack?
I found myself becoming a great New York City anomaly; a performer who hates restaurant work. I’ve held down many a typical actor’s “survival job,” but that kind of thing has never appealed to me, and I knew there had to be something better out there. I wanted work that would really engage me – a job where I’d actually be called upon to use my brain and my creativity. A friend invited me on a Museum Hack tour he was guiding and I had the time of my life. So this year when the job listing was brought to my attention, I leapt at the chance.

Bet posing for a living picture

3. Tell us about one of your favorite Museum Hack experiences.
The first time I worked on a night time VIP tour and we brought the group up into the galleries after the other visitors were gone, I couldn’t believe it. There they were – these giant rooms, full of ancient art, completely empty except for us, lit with low lights. It was astoundingly serene. I felt like Claudia in “From The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler” …nervous, excited, and incredibly fortunate to witness something so beautiful.

4. What are 3 fun facts that most people don’t know about you?

  • I can recite all eighteen stanzas of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” from memory.
  • My first real summer job was being a costumed colonial character in Philadelphia’s historic district.
  • To this day, the only sport for which I have ever won a trophy is competitive boogie boarding.

5. If you had to be trapped in the Museum overnight, what would you do?
I would absolutely run through the American wing, since one cannot run inside the museum during the day. I would go sing inside a bunch of different galleries (to see which one has the best acoustics, for future reference). I would make myself a cup of coffee and go drink it (carefully) in the Frank Lloyd Wright rooms. Then I would make myself a cup of tea and drink it in the Astor Court garden. If I were able to have friends with me, we would play the most epic game of hide-and-seek that has ever been played in the history of time. My hiding place would probably be inside a suit of armor in the Medieval wing, or inside Marie Antoinette’s tiny dog bed in the Rococo galleries. I would run up and down the stairs to play both parts of Romeo and Juliet in the Spanish courtyard. Then I’d chill in the Sackler wing and watch the sun come up by the Temple of Dendur. Pretty typical, I know.

6. If you were to be reincarnated as an animal, which would it be and why?
Absolutely and without a doubt I would be a giraffe. A giraffe is the animal I feel most closely resembles me. Their Latin name literally translates to “fast-walking camel-leopard.” They are long and gangly, like me, and sort of awkward, like me, but also kind of strangely graceful, like me (I hope). When they run they can go up to 31 miles per hour but always look like they’re moving in slow motion. A giraffe’s saliva is antiseptic so you don’t have to worry about germs when it licks your face. The little horn-like protuberances on a giraffe’s head are called ossicones, and if I were ever going to have horn-like protuberances on my head, I would like them to be called ossicones, because that’s an awesome word. For all these reasons, I would be reincarnated as a giraffe.

7. If you could work at any other museum, which one would you choose?
This is hard to answer. I’ve been to and loved a lot of museums, but if I was tied up and forced to pick just one, I’d go for the Tate Modern in London. I lived in London for a bit during school, and visited this place more than anywhere else. The building and its collection are amazing enough, but the Turbine Hall Gallery is just beyond belief. It used to hold the electricity generators when the building was a power station, and now it’s a gallery space of incredible magnitude – over a hundred feet tall and five hundred feet long – which has housed some of the most astounding art installations that I’ve ever heard of. I’d work there so I could be sure never to miss anything that comes through.

Thank you to Bex for giving amazing tours and for this great interview. Read more interviews with the Museum Hack team here.


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